Saturday, May 10, 2014

Video of #Fukushima I NPP Seen from Ocean, 1.5 Kilometer Away


People at Umi-Labo ("sea laboratory") in Iwaki City, a non-profit citizens' group, went near TEPCO's Hirono Thermal Power Plant, Fukushima II (Daini) Nuclear Power Plant, and Fukushima I (Daiichi) Nuclear Power Plant for the second time on April 27, 2014 on a fishing boat that had survived the March 11, 2011 tsunami. They came as close as 1.5 kilometer from Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant.

Apparently, there is no restriction that prohibits anyone from going near Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant by boat. So far, I only know of this group that has done that. No research institute nor nuclear expert (other than IAEA) has bothered.

According to Mainichi Shinbun (5/7/2014) reporting the trip:

  • The air radiation level on the boat at 1.5 kilometer from Fukushima I NPP was 0.05 microsievert/hour, surprisingly low, due to the shielding effect of water (ocean).

  • The ocean soil sample taken at Fukushima I NPP contained 417 Bq/Kg of radioactive cesium, whereas the ocean soil sample taken off Iwaki City had 287 Bq/Kg.


In the Mainichi article, the captain of the fishing boat says, "Isn't it amazing, how small Fukushima I NPP looks from the ocean? And this small plant is troubling the world." He had saved his boat by riding the tsunami waves on March 11, 2011.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

And someone should tell that fishing boat captain that if another Carrington Event occurs he'll be even more astonished in his role as Witness to Extinction of All Life on Earth.

radiation map daily updates said...

they probably breathing in buckyballs

Joffan said...

It would be very interesting to see a full map of seafloor cesium levels within a 20km radius.

This paper, Distribution of local 137Cs anomalies on the seafloor near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant seems to be a good attempt to start this process.

Anonymous said...

We can only imagine, Joffan, how many orders of magnitude the harbor sediments must have been above baseline before Tepco poured the clay-like concrete over it.

And seeing as cesium tends to stay suspended with ease in waters, to be finding that much on the seafloor in 3 years ...

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