Friday, April 27, 2012

NHK News: "30 People Died of Acute Radiation Sickness in Chernobyl Accident"

That's the only deaths that NHK mentions in the news on April 26, 2012, on the 26th anniversary of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant accident.

From NHK News (part; 4/26/2012):

チェルノブイリ原発では、1986年の4月26日、実験運転中の原子炉で爆発が起きて大量の放射性物質が外部に放出され、半径30キロ以内の住民13万人余りが避難しました。

At Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, an explosion happened in the reactor during the test run on April 26, 1986, dispersing a large amount of radioactive materials. 130,000 residents inside the 30 kilometer radius from the plant evacuated.

この事故で、原発の職員と消防士らおよそ30人が急性放射性障害などで死亡したほか、ウクライナをはじめ、ベラルーシ、ロシアでは、大量の放射性物質の拡散によって、今も環境への影響や住民の健康被害に対する対応が大きな課題となっています。

In this accident, about 30 people including the plant workers and firefighters died of acute radiation sickness. In the Ukraine, Belarus and Russia, there are big problems even today of dealing with the environmental effect and the damage to the health of the residents due to the dispersion of large amount of radioactive materials.

12 comments:

Viola said...

Maybe we should send them an invitation to this forum, to be held in Geneva, Switzerland, at May 12/13
Please, european readers - if possible, consider to attend it!
http://independentwho.org/en/2012/04/08/forum-on-radioprotection/

Anonymous said...

"NEW YORK, New York, April 26, 2010 (ENS) - Nearly one million people around the world died from exposure to radiation released by the 1986 nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl reactor, finds a new book from the New York Academy of Sciences published today on the 24th anniversary of the meltdown at the Soviet facility.

The book, "Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment," was compiled by authors Alexey Yablokov of the Center for Russian Environmental Policy in Moscow, and Vassily Nesterenko and Alexey Nesterenko of the Institute of Radiation Safety, in Minsk, Belarus.

The authors examined more than 5,000 published articles and studies, most written in Slavic languages and never before available in English...."

The truth is out there.

Anonymous said...

I showed that book to my Japanese student studying English and he came out in cold sweats, never saw him again,he was very pro nuke...i took him to task on his delusions... some people just dont wanna know the truth

Anonymous said...

NHK is clearly a government propaganda mouth piece. I do hope my fellow Japanese start using brain and realize the truth that the rest of the world aleady know -- ONE MILLION people died, according to Russian Government radio, not the mere 30 people. The first victims were the local residents and the 'jumpers' who bravely tackled the Chernobyl accident.

If you know of any Japanese people, also show them this video, "The Legacy of Chernobyl," which just came on enenews.

" http://goo.gl/n5tME "

It could be a near future of Japanese citizens... considering the way the JP government is refusing to see the seriousness of Fukushima accident, refusing to evacuate wider areas, and refusing to address food chain contamination.

Anonymous said...

Is the NHK comment incorrect? Were there more who died from acute radiation sickness?

And, as anybody who has been following the discussion knows, that book mentioned above by Anonymous, was neither written by the NY Academy of Sciences, nor was it endorsed by them. The author of that book, Yablokov, comes with his own baggage, and it is hardly without controversy. He deliberately set out to find alarming statistics, and when he didn't find them he fabricated them. The truth may be out there, but you have to sift through a lot of junk to find it. Those who wish to believe that Fukushima is the new apocalypse, rush to every publication that supports their conclusion, just as the pro-nuke crowd rushes to every publication that supports their own philosophy.

Anonymous said...

I can only repeat the comment I just posted to a previous article on this blog:

One thing that always seriously angers me is when people name the UNSCEAR report(s) as proof that (relatively) few deaths resulted from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. If one bothers to read the whole report(s) thoroughly, it is very clear that the reported numbers are only those that one can be certain of to be radiation-related. And UNSCEAR admits at the same time that a) reliable data was scarce for various reasons AND b) that it is most of the time practically impossible to establish with certainty a link between reported death or disease cases and radiation.

Unless, of course, I'm reading the UNCSEAR report(s) incorrectly, the relatively low numbers are practically meaningless. Concluding from them that radiation exposure is really not all that bad is, imho, idiotic if not outright deliberately deceptive.

2008 report:
http://www.unscear.org/docs/reports/2008/11-80076_Report_2008_Annex_D.pdf

2000 report (not linked on UNSCEAR's web site anymore, although 2008 report is based on it):
http://www.unscear.org/docs/reports/annexj.pdf

*mscharisma*

The Blue Light said...

'30 people died'. What rot. After the USSR collapsed a lady in the Russian parliament, the Duma I think, got hold of a secret KGB document that stated that by the 20-05-1986 more than 10000 workers, firefighter, soldiers and scientists were in hospital suffering from radiation exposures strong enough to cause radiation burn lesions. Radiation exposures of this level kill a sizable portion of victims

Anonymous said...

the purpose of telling people that "30 persons died from radioation sickness" is to dissinform them about the danger of radioactive particles dust. The government (and NHK) simply can't be trusted at all. And if it can't be trusted about Fukushima, well, it can't be trusted on anything at all. It is lying everytime it is convenient, it means, it is lying all the time.

Anonymous said...

I can only repeat what I already posted under a different article: To name the UNSCEAR report(s) as proof that (relatively) few deaths resulted from the Chernobyl nuclear accident seems inappropriate to me. Reading the whole report(s) thoroughly, it is very clear that the reported numbers are only those that one can be certain of to be radiation-related. And UNSCEAR admits that a) reliable data was scarce for various reasons AND b) that it is most of the time practically impossible to establish with certainty death or disease cases reported in registries are indeed caused by radiation.

To me that means the relatively low numbers are practically meaningless. Concluding from them that radiation exposure is really not all that bad is to me a questionable practice if not outright deliberately deceptive.

2008 report:
http://www.unscear.org/docs/reports/2008/11-80076_Report_2008_Annex_D.pdf

2000 report (not linked on UNSCEAR's web site anymore, although 2008 report is based on it):
http://www.unscear.org/docs/reports/annexj.pdf

*mscharisma*

robertb said...

Awesome!

robertb said...

I watched this debate on youtube. They wouldn't recognize any research that was performed by the government

robertb said...

...was not performed by the government. Damn it.

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